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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. look at spain now. the word is at 50% of young people on unemployment. >> rose: that is the number. >> it's terrifying, correct. >> rose: yes so then at 25 you don't know how every second, young professional doesn't know where he will work. so russia does maybe a little bit better than average in europe. with human rights, well, the stories get famous, they even get more famous than the killing of miners in south africa which amazes me in the modern world. >> rose: you mean the story does get a lot of attention. but there were even medvedev thought, had some question about how long they should be in prison. >> i think they should not even talk about seven years, that's ridiculous. >> rose: i mean your friend, the president could stop this in a second. >> well, i don't think first of all he's thinking about how to put these girls in prison in the first place. most of the people in russia were disgusted with the fact that they went to the biggest-- . >> rose: they didn't approve-- it is one thing not to approve what they did, it was a is a tire about him, yes. >> i think i separate.
an act tack spain. >> for every day, there could be another london bombing or another marriott. a myriad of events could happen so that's the pressure you're under as well. >> rose: but not to contradict that point we also know events took place and continue to take place after osama bin laden was killed because al-qaeda spawned kind of different organizions, in asia. >> yes. >> rose: what was the most difficult thing for you as a filmmaker to take this brilliant screen play, screen writing and turn it into an adventure story? >> trying to be faithful to the research, be faithful to the characters, be faithful, really give the audience a look at what it might be like to work in the intelligence community on a hunt this important. what would that be like. i didn't have a clue before he began reporting this. >> can i let you in on a secret please. it's easy for her. >> rose: it's easy for her because she's good. >> it's not her first radio. >>> yes, exactly. >> i mean, you can't say that but i can say it for you. >> if you cast it right you have great material in front of you, it's a gr
poet and hero of cuba's independence from spain -- >> you need to cultivate the marti mind. the marti mind is simply that, as much love as i have for my own group, i have for every other group. to take possessive investment in each others' struggles. where whatever's happening to the gay community, is happening to us. whatever's happening in the asian community, that's us. instead of possessive commodified investment in our identities, we need to take possessive investment in our other communities' struggles. >> the life and work of junot diaz contain many worlds, and that makes him all the more worth listening to. his imagination travels between the old and the new, between the america that was and the america we're becoming. straddling different cultures, yet american to the core -- he seems to be looking in every direction at once -- a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man very much of the here and now. in his first book, "drown" and in "the brief wondrous life of oscar wao" -- the novel that won him the pulitzer prize, diaz writes in short, vivid strokes of realspeak
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)